‘Lines of Color: Live at Jazz Standard’ Review (via Wall Street Journal)

Six years ago composer and arranger Ryan Truesdell began a research project into the archives of Gil Evans (1912-1988), the great jazz bandleader, arranger and composer. The results of this personal obsession have become a thriving career. Mr. Truesdell, who is now 35, had been a fan of the jazz great since his teens, and he studied Evans’s music as a student at the New England Conservatory of Music. He approached the Evans family and gained access to his manuscripts. During his perusal, Mr. Truesdell began finding arrangements that had never been performed.

For any fan of orchestral jazz, this was a Life-on-Mars level discovery. His employer at the time (whom he occasionally still works for on a project-to-project basis), the composer and bandleader Maria Schneider, an Evans protégée, encouraged him to form a band and record the music. He created the Gil Evans Project in 2011 and their recording, “Centennial: Newly Discovered Works of Gil Evans” (ArtistShare, 2012), stunned the jazz world. It was nominated for three Grammy Awards in 2013 and won one for Best Instrumental Arrangement for the song “How About You.”

The timing of Mr. Truesdell’s undertaking couldn’t have been better. Evans’s influence can be heard both directly and indirectly throughout the current jazz scene. Ms. Schneider’s orchestra, which employs many of the same musical innovations that Evans did—an impressionistic sound, unusual harmonies and unique instrumentation—has become one of the leading groups in jazz. Darcy James Argue leads a big band called Secret Society, which has won praise for its two Evans-influenced recordings, and earlier this year Mr. Argue was the recipient of both a Doris Duke Performing Artist Award and Guggenheim Fellowship.

Read the full article here!

Be first to comment

*